Quinoa with Gazpacho and Red Beans

Quinoa with Gazpacho and Red Beans

Quinoa with Gazpacho and Red Beans
I was looking for a vegetarian recipe that showcased the most common vegetables popping up in our gardens, farmer’s markets, and CSA’s this summer, but was filling enough to satisfy any carnivore’s appetite. Between the beans and the high-protein quinoa, this recipe fits the bill and is quite tasty too! I served this to relatives this summer, and both adults and kids went back for seconds!
    Servings
    4-5people
    Cook Time
    30 minutes
    Meal Plan
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    This recipe has been added to your Meal Plan
    Servings
    4-5people
    Cook Time
    30 minutes
    Meal Plan
    Add to Meal Plan:
    This recipe has been added to your Meal Plan
    Ingredients
    • 1cup quinoa, rinsed well
    • 1teaspoon cumin powder
    • 1/4teaspoon sea salt
    • 2 tomatoes, quartered
    • 2tablespoon red wine vinegar
    • 2 garlic clove
    • 1/2teaspoon chili powder
    • 1 yellow bell pepper, diced
    • 1 small red onion, diced
    • 1 cucumber, diced
    • 1 zucchini, diced
    • 1 (15.5 oz) can red beans, rinsed and drained
    • 1/2cup feta cheese, crumbled
    • 1/2cup fresh cilantro, chopped
    Instructions
    1. Bring 2 cups of water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add quinoa, cumin, and salt; reduce to a simmer, cover and cook for 15 minutes.
    2. While quinoa cooks: In blender, combine tomatoes and next 3 ingredients (through chili powder). Blend until smooth.
    3. In large bowl, toss tomato dressing with veggies (pepper, red onion, cucumber, and zucchini). Season with salt and pepper.
    4. Drain and rinse red beans. Set aside.
    5. Fluff quinoa and divide evenly among 4 bowls. Top with gazpacho, red beans, feta cheese, and cilantro.
    Recipe Notes

    If you would like to add a meat to this meal, grilled or skillet-fried chicken sausages go very well with the quinoa and red beans.

    Nutritionally, quinoa might be considered a super grain--although it is not really a grain, but the seed of a leafy plant that's distantly related to spinach. Quinoa has excellent reserves of protein and unlike other grains, is not missing the amino acid lysine, so the protein is more complete (a trait it shares with other "non-true" grains such as buckwheat and amaranth). Quinoa offers more iron than other grains and contains high levels of potassium and riboflavin, as well as other B vitamins: B6, niacin, and thiamin. It is also a good source of magnesium, zinc, copper, and manganese, and has some folate (folic acid).

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